Why you should visit Cuba


If you haven’t already heard, L3 members will be traveling to Cuba Oct. 30 – Nov. 3, 2013 for a one-on-one cultural exchange. This exclusive trip is made possible by a special People-to-People license and through the efforts of L3 member Daniel Schwartz. The trip is filling up quickly – we only have room for 14 more travelers. (Info and registration – click here)

This article from the Huffington Post talks about travel to Cuba (on a People-to-People license) and answers some questions you may have. To read the full article, please visit HuffingtonPost.com.

What to know before you go to Cuba

It wasn’t until very recently that American travelers were allowed to visit Cuba legally. But since The U.S. Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) lifted some of the travel restrictions and granted People-to-People licenses to select tour operators in 2011, Americans have been traveling the short distance between the U.S. and Cuba in droves to participate in one-on-one cultural exchanges with Cuban people.

As more Americans learn about this fantastic travel opportunity, we’ve begun fielding questions about travel to Cuba. Travelers realize that Cuba is different from other destinations, and they have lots of questions about the rules (what is and isn’t allowed) and how Americans are perceived after so many years of embargo-fueled shortages of just about everything. Here are some questions–and my replies–to a few of the most frequently asked questions about legal travel to Cuba.

Why should I visit Cuba?

After years of embargo, Cuba lives in a state of something like suspended animation. Time there has stood still, which is readily apparent as soon as you step off the plane. It’s truly the shortest distance you’ll ever travel to enter an entirely different world. But if you’re open-minded and appreciate history, culture rich in art and music, resourcefulness in the extreme, and exquisite tropical scenery as a backdrop for classic automobiles, you’ll fall in love with the island of Cuba.

You should visit Cuba if you are ready to engage, on a daily basis, with the people. This isn’t a typical tour, with visits to the national monuments, shopping, and relaxing on the (gorgeous) Caribbean beaches. Instead, you’ll spend your time meeting teachers, doctors, dancers, professors, farmers, young entrepreneurs, and more–in short, people from all walks of life. You’ll engage with them in lively conversations about how they live and how you live. You’ll exchange ideas about work, play, medical care, senior citizens, preschool education, the arts, food, and many other topics.

You’ll also get to see how Cubans are learning to be entrepreneurs, despite their Communist system, in businesses such as restaurants (known as paladars) run by families. These are just a few of the reasons why you should visit Cuba. The fact that Cuba has been off limits to U.S. citizens for 60+ years and has been a symbol of “forbidden fruit” that avid travelers have been dying to taste goes without saying!

For more, click over to HuffingtonPost.com.